History of Lovech

History of Lovech 

The city is the successor of the Thracian city of Melta (today's region of Hisarlaka), which is a strategic location on the main road from the Danube-Aegean Sea. During the Middle Ages the town remained an important military center and was called Lovuts (in translation - a town of hunters) and that from the 11th century. During the 12th century it was moved to the right bank of the river Osam, where is the Varosha quarter. After Turnovo Uprising Lovech fortress firmly defend the approaches to the apartments and after 3-month siege, the Byzantine Empire was forced to conclude a peace treaty. Since the end of Byzantine rule it was known by its present name - Lovech. During the 13th and especially the 14th century, it is one of the largest cities and castles in north Bulgaria and enviable economic prosperity. The town fell under Ottoman rule in 1393. The last independent ruler of Lovech Fortress - Stanko Kusama becomes a rebel after his downfall. In the first centuries of Ottoman rule, the city reduced and only in the 18th and especially the 19th century, developed through crafts and trade. It's called Alton Lovech (Golden Lovech). In 1870, the city has 11,000 inhabitants. Already in 1839 the struggle for independent Bulgarian church starts here. The first schools were opened in 1846-1847 and one of the first teachers here is the poet and writer Petko Slavejkov. In 1870 the library was established here, and two years later the first theatrical performance took place under the direction of Angel. There is an old covered wooden bridge over the river Osam river but took him in 1872. Only two years after a master Kolyo Fitcheto built his famous covered bridge with 24 small workshops there. Unfortunately he was burned in a fire in 1925. This (unique in the country) covered bridge was built like the old one.

Covered Bridge

During the years of the national liberation movement (the second half of the 19th century) Lovech becomes a revolutionary capital of Bulgaria. In 1869 Vasil Levski laid the foundations of the local revolutionary committee and the following year he shows Lovech as the center of the Internal Revolutionary Organization. On July 17, 1877 Lovech is released from squadron Parensov, but 10 days later the Turks conquered it again and slaughtered 2,500 Bulgarians in the town and its surroundings. The city was finally released on September 3, 1877 by the troops of General Imeretinski, Skobelev and General Dobrowolski. His freedom was won at the cost of the 1683 Russian casualties. After the liberation Lovech lost markets of the Ottoman Empire. Construction of the railroad Levski - Lovech (1932) and its extension to Troyan (1948) gave impetus to the development of the city. For the past few years it has established itself as a major cultural and tourist center.

 

« back to articles